Thursday, November 10, 2005

St. Martin of Tours

November 11 is the feast of St. Martin of Tours. He was a pagan Roman who was converted and baptized. Martin went on to become a bishop and he did much to evangelize the countryside of France. Certainly he must be interceding for France today, which has largely abandoned the Catholic faith.

You probably remember the famous story of Martin meeting a beggar who was freezing cold. Martin cut his own cloak in two, and gave half to the beggar. Later on, Jesus appeared to him and told Martin that he was the beggar. "Whatever you do to one of these, the least of my brethren, you do unto me."

A practical way to honor St .Martin today would be to make a donation to the poor.

4 comments:

Barb and Brad said...

Ummmmm... Sister?
90% of France in Romen Catholic.
God Bless,
Barb

Sr. Lorraine said...

While it's true that a majority of the French people are nominally Catholic, very few actually practice the faith. For all practical purposes they're secularists. Mass attendance is extremely low and a majority of the people reject Catholic moral teachings.

Barb and Brad said...

I don't know what to tell ya Sister. I guess there aren't too many of you real Catholics. I'm a bit to the left so I guess I'm probibly out too.
God bless,
Barb

xaipe said...

There is a young French woman in our choir--in fact, I am going to her house tomorrow for lunch. She came to the States last year because of her husband's job, and just had a baby this summer. She is very Catholic.
Perhaps the Church in France is, again as "eldest daughter of the Church" going ahead of the rest of the former Christendom in having a small but exceptionally fervent group of faithful in the midst of a secularized culture. Few, but really salt and light.
When I was in Rome, I was impressed one day at a pilgrim group coming into St. Peter's for Mass, all singing. It seemed that the procession stretched for a mile, two by two, and mostly young families. It wasn't a typical tour group; there was a solidity and devotion there that were striking. And they were from France.

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